Joslyn Short Courses

Love the luxury of learning about Joslyn’s collections from the comfort of your couch? If you missed this series last summer, you're in luck! Join us as Joslyn Short Courses return, by popular demand, this winter. Cocktails optional!

Structured as weekly online seminars, our curator-led courses take place in a virtual learning environment. Class sizes are kept small (capped at 20 people) to maximize interaction with the curator, and participants should feel comfortable using the Zoom platform. Each short course is three weeks in duration, and each class will last approximately one hour. These courses are designed for anyone who would like to learn more about art and develop skills for closer looking. No prior knowledge of art history is required.

Technical Requirements

Participants will need a computer or tablet with a webcam, microphone, and speakers. Connection is via Zoom, a web-based cloud platform, and participants will receive instructions and an invitation to log-in prior to the start of each 3-week course. A test connection prior to each scheduled lesson is encouraged.

For more information please contact Nancy Round, Director of Education and Outreach at nround@joslyn.org.


Reaction and Resistance in Postwar Art
Tuesdays: February 2, 9, 16; 5-6 pm
Instructor: Karin Campbell, Phil Willson Curator of Contemporary Art


Pictured:
Rashid Johnson (American, born 1977), Untitled Microphone Sculpture , 2018, bronze, ceramic tile, mirror tile, shea butter, black soap, and wax, 60 x 60 x 6 1/8 in. Museum purchase, Baumgarten Art Endowment Fund, 2018.4,

About the Course
The history of art is traditionally thought of as inherently forward-moving along an A then B then C axis. Curators and historians tend to silo objects, artists, and entire movements based on predetermined rules, yet many different art historical narratives reject the concept of a tidy, linear progression. In Joslyn’s Pavilion galleries, Jackson Pollock, Helen Frankenthaler, and Kenneth Noland engage in a seemingly logical and simpatico conversation, yet the true nature of their shared relationships is far more complex. Through the lens of these paintings and other important works from the Museum’s postwar and contemporary collection, this course will frame stories about art in terms of reaction and resistance. From the backlash to Abstract Expressionism and its dominance over American art-making in the mid-twentieth century to more recent responses to racism, gender disparity, and the political landscape, this course will provide an opportunity to interrogate and upend a positivist approach to art history.


About the Curator
Karin Campbell is the Phil Willson Curator of Contemporary Art at Joslyn Art Museum. Since joining the Museum in 2012, she has curated several major exhibitions, including the traveling survey Sheila Hicks: Material Voices and 30 Americans from the Rubell Family Collection. In addition to overseeing Joslyn’s collection of postwar and contemporary art, Campbell is the principal curator for the Karen and Doug Riley Contemporary Artists Project Gallery, the first space in the Museum’s history dedicated to living artists. Karin holds a BA in Art History and Political Science from the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA, and an MA in Curatorial Studies from the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY.

Registration
Space is limited and advance registration is required. Enrollment fee includes sales tax: $50 per 3-week course; Joslyn Members enjoy a 15% discount. Registration fee is non-refundable.




Native American Modernism
Tuesdays: February 23, March 2, 9; 5-6 pm
Instructor: Annika Johnson, Ph.D., Associate Curator of Native American Art


Pictured:
Oscar Howe (Yanktonai Dakota, 1915-1983), The Origin of Corn, 1949, tempera on paper, 21 3/9 x 29 3/8 in., Gift of Morton Steinhart, 1949.180

About the Course
Native American artists are largely excluded from the canon of American modernism. Yet, many canonic artists are indebted to Indigenous forms of artmaking. For instance, Jackson Pollock’s drip paintings were partially inspired by Diné (Navajo) sandpainting, and Josef and Anni Albers’s Pre-Columbian art collection influenced their design aesthetic. In this course, we will learn about Native American art of the early and mid-20th century and how it can enrich – if not upend – our understanding of American modernism. We’ll look at works by the Kiowa Six, Awa Tsireh, Angel de Cora, Mary Sully, Oscar Howe, George Morrison, and many others. Key concepts such as appropriation, primitivism, and the Indian Abstract will inform our discussion of a broadened American art.



About the Curator

Annika Johnson joined Joslyn in 2019 as Associate Curator of Native American Art. She received her doctorate in art history from the University of Pittsburgh with a specialization in Dakota art. Her research has been supported by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.







Registration

Space is limited and advance registration is required. Enrollment fee includes sales tax: $50 per 3-week course; Joslyn Members enjoy a 15% discount. Registration fee is non-refundable.




Neoclassicism to Impressionism 
Tuesdays: March 16, 23, 30; 5-6 pm Instructor: Taylor J. Acosta, Ph.D., Associate Curator of European Art 

Pictured: Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926), The Meadow, 1879, oil on canvas, 32 x 39 1/4 in. Gift of Mr. William Averell Harriman, 1944.79, Photograph © Bruce M. White, 2019.

About the Course
An introduction to European painting and sculpture from the French Revolution to the dawn of the twentieth century, this course will consider the ways in which art reflected the many social, economic, and cultural changes of this rich historical period. Lectures will explore a range of themes including art and politics, the academic tradition, the shift from history painting to scenes of everyday life, Orientalism, the rise of landscape painting, and the origins of modernism and the avant-garde. Emphasis will be on major figures including David, Ingres, Delacroix, Turner, Courbet, Bouguereau, Gérôme, Manet, Monet, and Degas, and on works from Joslyn Art Museum’s permanent collection.

About the Curator
Taylor J. Acosta is the Associate Curator of European Art at Joslyn Art Museum. Taylor joined the curatorial staff in 2019 and is responsible for the Museum’s collection of European art from the Renaissance to the early twentieth century. She is currently preparing the first comprehensive catalogue of the Museum’s European collection in over three decades. A specialist in nineteenth-century French painting, she has lectured and published on academic art, Realism, and Jules Breton. Taylor studied art history at Dartmouth College, the University of Glasgow, and the University of Minnesota, where she received her Ph.D. in 2018.


Registration
Space is limited and advance registration is required. Enrollment fee includes sales tax: $50 per 3-week course; Joslyn Members enjoy a 15% discount. Registration fee is non-refundable.