Postwar and Contemporary
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Jennifer Steinkamp (American, born 1958),
Judy Crook, 2 , 2012
single-channel digital video projection,
Museum purchase, bequest of Rose Marie Baumgarten, 2013.10
Jennifer Steinkamp is one of the most highly regarded digital video artists working today. By projecting images directly onto walls and other architectural features, Steinkamp alters how we experience physical space. Judy Crook, 2 is part of an ongoing series that honors teachers who fostered the artist’s career. Steinkamp studied with Judy Crook at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, and was influenced by her professor’s command of color theory. In this animation, a tree sways elegantly as its leaves gradually shift from the vibrant greens of springtime to the warm hues of autumn before finally being shed, leaving its branches barren. The cycle begins again as the tree buds new leaves.



Through exhibitions, permanent collection acquisitions, and programming, Joslyn is working to elevate and amplify perspectives that historically have been underrepresented in the galleries. The Museum recognizes the potential of interpretation to highlight the diverse histories, beliefs, and practices embodied in works of art. With OMAHA SPEAKS, we look to broaden the conventional interpretation of objects in our permanent collection by introducing commentary from leaders in our community.



Beaufield Berry-Fisher, playwright, podcaster, content creator, activist, mother

I have a photo of my mother and son standing in front of this work, hand in hand.

I stand behind them from my own place in our bloodline, perfectly between them, and snap this moment into eternity.

My mother, pointing and asking this curious two year-old what he notices, just as she had done with me, many years ago.? Little ways of teaching.? Little ways of learning.

I find something fantastic in standing between the people you made and the ones that made you, your family tree a living, pulsing reality.

I write about trees and I write about ancestry.? I have a tree tattoo (albeit unfinished and cheaply done, like much of life).

I think of trees in tragic ways as they've harbored death for my people.? I think of trees in majestic ways––towering and life giving.? I think of trees––in memory, the one we claimed for ourselves during childhood outings at a local park. The trees we climb, the trees we pull fruit from, the trees that were good for hide and seek.

Nothing is so ornamental in its showing of the seasons of birth, life, and death.

I was the child, now I am the mother, one day I will be the elder, and one day I, too, will return to the earth.

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Beaufield Berry-Fisher is a playwright, podcaster, content creator, activist, and (most importantly) a mother. Her work has been seen on stages across the United States, including Red Summer (2019) at the Bluebarn Theater in Omaha. While living through the pandemic, Berry-Fisher started the Village Co-Op, an alternative to traditional and remote schooling that allows families to survive and children to flourish in their early (and odd) first years in school. Her newest podcast "Say Her Name" premiered January 10th, 2021.

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